BBC TV Feature: Can an ‘electronic lollipop’ simulate taste?

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http://www.live.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-26487218

8 March 2014 Last updated at 00:09 GMT

Scientists at City University, London have developed a machine that they say is able to simulate taste.

When touched on the tongue, the experts claim that the so called “electronic lollipop” is able to trick taste receptors using an electronic signal.

BBC Click’s Spencer Kelly reports.

Watch more clips on the Click website. If you are in the UK you can watch the whole programme on BBC iPlayer.

BBC TV Feature: How to turn your smartphone into a ‘smell phone’

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bbc-blocks-dark http://www.live.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-26526916

12 March 2014 Last updated at 08:26 GMT

Award-winning chef Andoni Luis Aduriz is developing an app to bring the full sensory experience of his cooking to smartphones.

The app allows the user to virtually recreate one of his signature dishes which can then be smelt through the use of a device which plugs into the phone. BBC Click’s Lara Lewington reports. Watch more clips on the Click website. If you are in the UK you can watch the whole programme on BBC iPlayer.

Adrian David Cheok, Mixed Reality Lab, City University London, features on BBC Click | BBC News Channel

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BBC_click

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03y9z19/broadcasts/upcoming

DURATION: 30 MINUTES

Click investigates the latest ‘smell’ tech. Includes tech news and Webscape.

Upcoming Broadcast Schedule:
Also available on BBC iPlayer:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03y9z19/Click_08_03_2014/

Broadcast Times Outside UK on BBC World News:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/n13xtmd5/broadcasts/upcoming

Malaysian delegation visits the City University Hangout

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http://www.city.ac.uk/news/2014/feb/malaysian-delegation-visits-the-hangout

13 February 2014

Managing Director Tan Sri Dato’ Azman bin Hj Mokhtar of the Government of Malaysia’s strategic investment fund, the Khazanah Nasional Berhad, is impressed with City talent in the heart of London’s Silicon Roundabout.

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A delegation from the Government of Malaysia’s strategic investment fund, the Khazanah National Berhad, visited the Hangout on January 30th.

Located at the epicentre of London’s Tech City, the Hangout provides a unique working environment and incubation space for City University London academics, students and start-ups to foster relationships with investors in the area in order to get their businesses off the ground.

Khazanah Nasional Berhad promotes economic growth and makes strategic investments on behalf of the Government of Malaysia and is keenly interested in partnering with technology companies and products originating at City. With an investment portfolio comprising over 50 major companies in Malaysia and abroad worth £30bn, Khazanah is involved in a broad spectrum of industries.

Led by managing director Tan Sri Dato’ Azman bin Hj Mokhtar, the Malaysian delegation listened attentively to a variety of presentations and investment opportunities. The Khazanah managing director was impressed with the “high level of creativity” being nurtured at City.

These included a presentation on taste and smell actuation via mobile phone from Professor of Pervasive Computing, Professor Adrian Cheok and PhD students from his Mixed Reality Lab; BarPassOfficial (for payment and collection of drink orders via smartphone); Mashmachines (a new media player bringing together sound, lighting, and video into a single user interface); Popcord (an innovative lightweight mobile phone charger); TechCityNews (London’s leading tech sector news and analysis resource); Modafirma (a social commerce platform allowing emerging and independent fashion designers to reach and sell directly to a global audience); and AtomicDataLabs (a software and data management company building applications in large datasets).

Also in attendance were Pro Vice Chancellor for Research & Enterprise, Professor John Fothergill; Director of Enterprise, Dr Sue O’Hare; Dean of the School of Engineering & Mathematical Sciences and the School of Informatics, Professor Roger Crouch; Professor of Dependability and Security, Professor Kevin Jones; Manager of the London City Incubator and Hangout founder, Leo Castellanos; and, Andrew Humphries, co-founder of The Bakery.

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Using mobiles to smell: How technology is giving us our senses

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http://www.theneweconomy.com/technology/using-mobiles-to-smell-how-technology-is-giving-us-our-senses-video

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

 

The New Economy interviews Professor Adrian Cheok of City University London to find out about a new technology that will allow people to taste and smell through their mobile phones

Scientists are coming increasingly closer to developing technology that will allow us to use all our senses on the internet. Professor Adrian Cheok, City University London, explains how mobile phones will soon allow people to taste and smell, what the commercial benefits of this technology might be, and just how much it’s going to cost.

The online world: it’s all about the visual and sound experience, but with three other senses, it can leave us short. Studies have demonstrated that more than half of human communication is non-verbal, so scientists are working on ways to communicate taste, touch, and smell over the internet. I’ve come to the City University London to meet Professor Adrian Cheok, who’s at the forefront of augmented reality, with new technology that will allow you to taste and smell through a mobile phone.

The New Economy: Adrian, this sounds completely unbelievable. Have you really found a way to transmit taste and smells via a mobile device?

Adrian Cheok: Yes, in our laboratory research we’ve been making devices which can connect electrical and digital signals to your tongue, as well as your nose. So for example, for taste we’ve created a device which you put on your tongue, and it has electrodes. What those do is artificially excite your taste receptors. So certain electrical signals will excite the receptors, and that will produce artificial taste sensations in your brain. So you will be able to experience, for example, salty, sweet, sour, bitter – the basic tastes on your tongue – without any chemicals.

It’s a device that you can attach to your mobile phone, and these devices will emit chemicals

And with smell we’re going in a couple of tracks. One is using chemicals, it’s a device that you can attach to your mobile phone, and these devices will emit chemicals. So that means that with apps and software on your phone, you can send someone a smell message. For example, you might get a message on Facebook, and it can send the smell of a flower. Or if your friend’s not in a very good mood it might be a bitter smell.

So the next stage of that is, we’re making devices which will have electrical and magnetic signals being transmitted to your olfactory bulb, which is behind your nose. It’ll be a device which you put in the back of your mouth, it will have magnetic coils, and similar to the electrical taste actuation, it will excite the olfactory bulb using electrical currents. And then this will produce an artificial smell sensation in your brain.

Already scientists have been able to connect optical fibre to neurons of mice, and that means that we can connect electrical signals to neurons.

With the rate of change, for example with Moore’s Law, you get exponential increase in technology. I think within our lifetimes we’re going to see direct brain interface. So in fact what you will get is essentially, you can connect all these signals directly to your brain, and then you will be able to experience a virtual reality without any of these external devices. But essentially connecting to the neural sensors of your brain. And of course that also connects to the internet. So essentially what we will have is direct internet connection to our brain. And I think that will be something we will see in our lifetime.

The New Economy: So direct brain interface – that sounds kind of dangerous. I mean, could there be any side-effects?

Adrian Cheok: Well we’re still at the very early stages now. So scientists could connect, for example, one optical fibre to the neuron of a mouse. And so what it has shown is that we can actually connect the biological world of brains to the digital world, which is computers.

Of course, this is still at an extremely early stage now. You know, the bio-engineers can connect one single neuron, so, we’re not anywhere near that level where we can actually connect to humans. You would have to deal with a lot of ethical and also privacy, social issues, risk issues.

So essentially what we will have is direct internet connection to our brain

Now if you have a virus on your computer, the worst it can do is cause your computer to crash. But you know, you could imagine a worst case: someone could reprogram your brain. So we’d have to think very carefully.

The New Economy: Well why is it important to offer smell over the internet?

Adrian Cheok: Fundamentally, smell and taste are the only two senses which are directly connected to the limbic system of the brain. And the limbic system of the brain is the part of the brain responsible for emotion and memory. So it is true that smell and taste can directly and subconsciously trigger your emotion, trigger your memory.

Now that we’re in the internet age, where more and more of our communication is through the internet, through the digital world, that we must bring those different senses – touch, taste and smell – to the internet; so that we can have a much more emotional sense of presence.

The New Economy: What will this be used for?

Adrian Cheok: Like all media, people want to recreate the real world. When cinema came out, people were filming, you know, scenes of city streets. To be able to capture that on film was quite amazing. But as the media developed, then it became a new kind of expression. And I believe it will be the same for the taste and smell media. Now that it’s introduced, at first people will just want to recreate smell at a distance. So for example, you want to send someone the smell of flowers, so Valentine’s Day for example, maybe you can’t meet your lover or your friend, but you can send the virtual roses, and the virtual smell of the roses to his or her mobile phone.

At the next stage it will lead to, I think, new kinds of creation. For example, music before; if you wanted to play music, you needed to play with an instrument, like a violin or a guitar. But now the young people can compose music completely digitally. Even there’s applications on your mobile phone, you can compose music with your finger, and it’s really professional. Similarly, that will be for smell and taste. We’ll go beyond just recreating the real world to making new kinds of creation.

The New Economy: So will it also have a commercial use?

Adrian Cheok: For advertising, because smell is a way to trigger emotions and memory subconsciously. Now, you can shut your eyes, and you can block your ears, but it’s very rare that you ever block your nose, because you can’t breathe properly! So people don’t block their nose, and that means advertising can always be channelled to your nose. And also we can directly trigger memory or an emotion. That’s very powerful.

You want to send someone the smell of flowers, so Valentine’s Day for example, maybe you can’t meet your lover or your friend, but you can send the virtual roses

We received interest from one of the major food manufacturers, and we’re having a meeting again soon. They make frozen food, and the difficulty to sell frozen food is, you can’t smell it. You just see these boxes in the freezer, but because it’s frozen, there’s no smell. But they want to have our devices so that when you pick up the frozen food maybe it’s like a lasagne, well you can have a really nice smell of what it would be.

The New Economy: How expensive will this be?

Adrian Cheok: We’re aiming to make devices which are going to be cheap. Because I think only by being very cheap can you make mass-market devices. So our current device, actually to manufacturer it, it’s only a few dollars.

The New Economy: Adrian, thank you.

Adrian Cheok: Thank you very much.

Adrian David Cheok, speaker on New Scientist panel

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Adrian David Cheok, speaker on New Scientist panel on “We can cure heartbreak – but should we?” Join LIVE on YouTube 14 Feb at noon ET/5 pm GMT

http://www.newscientist.com/special/cure-for-love

 

Speakers:

Larry Young, Emory University

Julie Carpenter, University of Washington

Brian Earp, University of Oxford

Adrian David Cheok, City University London.

 

Joined by moderator, Flora Graham, who is based in the New Scientist headquarters in London

 

Join public Hangout discussion live:

https://plus.google.com/events/c1fm4si9ft3i809up2tmelm8q04

Watch presentation live:

Radio Interview with Peter Warren on Password, London’s Resonance 104.4FM

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Resonance-FM

London’s Resonance 104.4FM

Password Radio Show: http://www.futureintelligence.co.uk/fis-password-radio-show/

The PassWord radio programme is the UK’s only regular-hour long foray into the world of science and technology and not only tells you about the latest developments in the area but what those technologies mean to you.

The radio show is produced by Jane Whyatt, an award winning radio producer for the BBC, and presented by Peter Warren, an award winning investigative journalist who has worked for the BBC and the Sunday Times Insight team, Password is a fascinating insight into the high-tech world that we now all inhabit. To hear our weekly technology radio programme PassWord with Peter Warren tune in to London’s Resonance 104.4FM or www.resonancefm.com at 1530 GMT on Sundays. You can listen live to Radio Castle’s PassWord show on Mondays 1100-1200 online www.radiocastle.com.

Mugaritz App That Lets People Smell Their Dishes

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http://www.finedininglovers.com/blog/news-trends/scentee-mugaritz-smell-food-phone/

BY FDL ON 

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Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz at the Mugaritz restaurant is working on a new digital app that lets users recreate one of the restaurant’s dishes on their screen before a device attached to the bottom of the phone kicks out the actual smell of the dish.

The device, called Scentee, is created by a Japanese company and it’s this technology that ProfessorAdrian Cheok from the City University in London harnessed while working with Chef Aduriz.

Scentee is basically a small tank that sits on the bottom of the phone. It’s controlled by an application and once triggered it emits a puff of odor. The idea is that you could one day send someone the scent of a coffee, great wine, or in the case of Mugaritz, actually smell a dish before you taste it.

Cheok says: “The Digital Food app opens up new vistas for people around the world who may not have had the opportunity to physically dine in the restaurant to virtually experience the real smell of gourmet food prepared by one of the world’s top restaurants and chefs. The revolutionary new device brings the sense of smell to mobile phone communications.”

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The Scentee device was shown this week at Madrid Fusion, it can be ordered online but it’s hard to find an English or American seller – at the moment the Japanese arm of Amazon stock the devices for ¥3,654 ($35) and the cartridges at ¥525 ($5).The app can be downloaded for iPhone and Android and the technology really is paving the way for a future of Scentagram style social media apps, supermarkets that let you smell the meals you’re buying and restaurants that trick diners by offering mixed scents and tastes at the table.

Cheok says the early future of the device will be driven by the adoption of private companies. He also notes that it could have wider applications away from the food and drink world, offering real medical benefits, saying that people with smell and taste disabilities could benefit from the technology: “Their experience of the world could be enhanced using technology. It could also be used by using familiar smells to trigger memories for elderly patients, reminding them to do things such as take their medication.”

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