Secrets of Japanese Meetings

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As a foreigner it is quite rare to be asked to the standard Japanese company meetings. What I mean are those meetings which are not something to do with international matters and there is no information in English. I was asked to represent our faculty to a meeting of the “Information Technology Center” (basically handling all computer administration and “Media Center” (basically libraries), representing our school. It was 6pm to 8pm on Friday night. On the one hand it was on the one hand extremely boring way to spend a Friday evening. But on the other hand I really could experience some secrets of Japanese culture. At each meeting there were two men doing almost all the talking. One man looked a bit older, talked less, and looked like the boss. We basically listened to a long list of reports. In western cultures meetings are held to actually discuss or decide something. But in Japanese meetings I think that the purpose is not to decide anything. In fact it seems everything had been decided before the meeting. At the end of the meeting they asked if anyone had questions but nobody did. We all bowed. I wondered what was the purpose of the meeting. But I guess it is a kind of “wa” or harmony which is important in Japanese culture. By me being physically present and representing the school we showed harmony with the decisions. I found it an interesting and somewhat entertaining experience of some more secrets of Japanese culture.

Descriptive Camera

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Descriptive Camera

Brilliant advice from Atari Founder on how to be innovative.

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Brilliant advice from Atari Founder on how to be innovative.

From the Mindshare conference.

Be Uncomfortable
“You wanna build your IQ higher in the next two years? Be uncomfortable. That means, learn something where you have a beginner’s mind. I like to play chess. So it turns out, the neurogenesis (the birth of new brain cells) of chess, for me, is over. My brain grew a great deal when I was first learning, but once I really got it down, it’s very, very incremental. So if you want to do it right, learn how to ski. And then once you feel like you’re kind of under control, learn how to snowboard. And then learn how to rollerblade, then do tai chi, then do yoga. Stay on the uncomfortable path and you will find that you can get smarter.”
Look For Beauty
“Walk to work, even if it’s four miles. Ride a bike to work. Drive a different way. On your way there, try to find beauty. You’d be surprised how much more of the neighborhood you can perceive and experience when you’re looking for unique spots of beauty. When you get to work, you’ll find that you have a better attitude, you’re more content, and you can put away your Zoloft.”
Move Your Body
“Exercise aggressively. Twenty minutes. Thirty minutes. Get your heart rate to 80% of your ability, and then for the next three hours, just learn something. It turns out that when you are exercising aggressively, your brain is creating BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), ‘Miracle-Gro for your brain.’ That is a precursor protein for dendrite formation (dendrites are branched extensions of nerve cells). You’re putting in hardware for the software.”
Go (The F***) To Sleep
“Remember that we can only in our forebrains handle 5-7 items. Our backbrains can handle massive amounts. So when you’re given a problem, think about it before you go sleep, and chances are you can solve it by the next morning. What’s happening is, your background processing is going on with many many more synapses, and you’d be surprised by the capability you’re able to unlock.”
Trust Your Ideas
“Innovation almost has zero constituency. For example, if I showed you this left-handed purple widget, maybe no one thinks it’s a good idea, yet it’s clearly innovative. And so, when Steve Jobs and I used to hang out, one of the things we used to talk about is innovation, and I told him, ‘Steve, if you believe in something, and you go into a room and there are 50 people there, and all 50 of them tell you that you’re crazy, stick with it. Stick with your project.’”
“Innovation is hard. It really is. Because most people don’t get it. Remember, the automobile, the airplane, the telephone, these were all considered toys at their introduction because they had no constituency. They were too new. And what you’re working on right now may in fact fall right into that. And if you see clearly, the pathway to the future, stick to it.”

Who to work for to be a Growth Hacker

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Who to work for to be a Growth Hacker

How do I learn to be a growth hacker? Work for one of these guys 🙂 | Andrew Chen (@andrewchen)

  • NameBackgroundTwitter
  • Noah KaganAppSumo, Mint, Facebooknoahkagan
  • David KingBlip.me, ex-Lil Green Patchdeekay
  • Mike GreenfieldCircle of Moms, ex LinkedInmike_greenfield
  • Ivan KiriginDropbox, ex-Facebookikirigin
  • Michael Birchex-Bebo, BirthdayAlarmmickbirch
  • Ivko Maksimovicex-Chainn/Compare Peopleivko
  • Dave Zohrobex-Hot or Not, MegaTastydzohrob
  • Jia Shenex-RockYoumetatek
  • James Currierex-Ticklejamescurrier
  • Stan Chudnovskyex-Ticklestan_chudnovsky
  • Siqi Chenex-Zyngablader
  • Ed BakerFacebookesbaker
  • Joe GreensteinFlixsterjoseph77b
  • Yee LeeGoogleyeeguy
  • Jamie QuintLookcraft, ex-Swipelyjamiequint
  • Elliot ShmuklerLinkedIneshmu
  • Aatif AwanLinkedInaatif_awan
  • Andy JohnsQuora, Twitter, Facebookibringtraffic
  • Robert Cezar MateiQuora, ex-Zyngarmatei
  • Nabeel HyattSpark, ex-Zynganabeel
  • Paul McKellarSV Angel, ex-Squarepm
  • Greg TsengTaggedgregtseng
  • Othman LarakiTwitterothman
  • Akash GargTwitter, ex-Hi5akashgarg
  • Jonathan KatzmanYahoo, ex-Xoopitjkatzman
  • Gustaf AlstromerVoxergustaf
  • Jon TienZyngajontien
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