BIGGERBRAINS.COM – USING SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS FOR ACADEMIC RESEARCH, interview with Adrian David Cheok

posted in: Media, Research | 0

USING SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS FOR ACADEMIC RESEARCH

Prof. Adrian David Cheok shares the insights on using social media tools to communicate and collaborate with your research community.
KNOWLEDGE CAPTURE AND SHARING—BIGGERBRAINS
Biggerbrains provides career development resources for early-career researchers. That is, those who have recently earned a PhD, are on their way to completion, or in a research career for less than five years.
It facilitates young researchers in career development by providing advice and guidance in the areas of Search and Discovery, Writing and Publishing, Networking, Funding and Career Planning. Featuring interviews with professors, Biggerbrains leverage the collective knowledge of the research community.
The site provides a broad mix of inspiring video interviews with professors, career-planning guides, featured skill development articles and materials, game and job alerts. The knowledge provided here is of benefit to all research areas, across all disciplines. There’s also a deeper section with a range of online tools and solutions.
Biggerbrains campaign powered by Elsevier.

Mobile implementation and user evaluation of the Huggy Pajama system

posted in: Research | 0

This paper appears in:
Haptics Symposium (HAPTICS), 2012 IEEE
Date of Conference: 4-7 March 2012
Author(s): Teh, J.K.S. 
IDMI, Nat. Univ., Singapore, Singapore 
Zhenling Tsai ;  Koh, J.T.K.V. ;  Cheok, A.D. 
Page(s): 471 – 478 
Product Type: Conference Publications

We introduce Huggy Pajama, a system for remote hugging targeted at parent-child communication. Expanding on experimentation and research shared in a previously published paper; in this paper we focus on development breakthroughs regarding the wearable output and independently controlled multiple air-actuated modules found in the mobile wearable jacket subsystem. We include practical data in designing the wearable and mobile version of Huggy Pajama with embedded electronic and pneumatic devices, as well as offer results from a user study, from which we find that in order to deliver a mediated hug of high fidelity, the system needs to be capable of actuating hugs with a wide and differing range of pressure. Finally, we also present results from this study that show an overall positive emotional affect in the use of the new and improved version of the Huggy Pajama system.

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?arnumber=6183833

Kissenger. Paper on Kiss Messenger published in Designing Interacting Systems 2012

posted in: Research | 0

Kissenger. Paper on Kiss Messenger published in Designing Interacting Systems 2012

AmbiKrafNEW PAPER: Ambikraf. Non-emissive, ubiquitous textile display. in Multimedia Tools and Applications

posted in: Research | 0

AmbiKraf
NEW PAPER: Ambikraf. Non-emissive, ubiquitous textile display. in Multimedia Tools and Applications

Light Perfume: Device to communicate by light and smell

posted in: Research | 0

Light Perfume: Device to communicate by light and smell

Mirroring is the behavior in which one person copies another person usually while in social interaction with them and is one of the most powerful ways to build rapport quickly. When meeting someone for the first time, mirroring their seating position, posture, body angle, gestures, expressions and tone of voice are some useful examples of doing this. Before long, your partner will start to feel that there’s something about you they like and they may even describe you as ‘easy to be with’.

Lighting and scents have shown to have an important role in reinforcing special perception, activity and mood setting, emotion, judgments, and even social relationship. Light Perfume was designed to help people mirror each other using visual and olfactory outputs to strengthen a user’s psychological bond with the partner. We do this by synchronizing the speed and blinking color of LEDs and emit the same perfume scent from each person’s device during a face-to-face conversation. The outputs are chosen based on inputs from the user’s environment such as noise levels and expressive body gestures.

1 2 3 4 5