Light Perfume: Device to communicate by light and smell

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Light Perfume: Device to communicate by light and smell

Mirroring is the behavior in which one person copies another person usually while in social interaction with them and is one of the most powerful ways to build rapport quickly. When meeting someone for the first time, mirroring their seating position, posture, body angle, gestures, expressions and tone of voice are some useful examples of doing this. Before long, your partner will start to feel that there’s something about you they like and they may even describe you as ‘easy to be with’.

Lighting and scents have shown to have an important role in reinforcing special perception, activity and mood setting, emotion, judgments, and even social relationship. Light Perfume was designed to help people mirror each other using visual and olfactory outputs to strengthen a user’s psychological bond with the partner. We do this by synchronizing the speed and blinking color of LEDs and emit the same perfume scent from each person’s device during a face-to-face conversation. The outputs are chosen based on inputs from the user’s environment such as noise levels and expressive body gestures.

Huggy Pajama paper awarded “Honorable Mention” at CHI 2012 Conference

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Huggy Pajama paper awarded “Honorable Mention” at CHI 2012 Conference.

Paper title: Keep in Touch: Channel, Expectation and Experience – Paper

Rongrong Wang – Virginia Tech, USA

Francis Quek – Center for Human Computer Interaction, Virginia Tech, USA

Deborah Tatar – Center for Human Computer Interaction, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia, United States, USA

Keng Soon Teh – National University of Singapore, Singapore

Adrian David Cheok – Keio University Graduate School of Media Design, Japan

Contribution & Benefit: Describes a remote touch study, showing communicative touch accompanied by speech can significantly influence people’s sense of connectedness. Identifies perception of communication intention as an important factor in touch communication design.

CHI 2012 – Program

Sound Perfume

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Face-to-face communication remains the most powerful human interaction. In this day and age, people have become dependent on electronic devices to communicate with others leading to many interpersonal difficulties and miscommunications in today’s society. We believe that face-to-face communication remains the most powerful human interaction and these devices can never fully replace the intimacy and immediacy of people conversing in the same room. If society loses its physical aspect, many of the subtle benefits that go along with physical face-to-face contact will also be lost.

Much of communication is done non-verbally and emotions can easily be transferred from person to person without the utterance of a single word. Sound Perfume is our attempt to encourage face-to-face communication by making it more emotional and memorable. We do this by augmenting a person’s experience through additional auditory and olfactory stimuli during social encounters. We designed wearable actuators that provide each user the ability to handcraft their sound and scent identity.

This identity is then transferred to another system when two people meet, using a unique technique known as eye contact interaction, stimulating each person with their partners sound and smell preference. We have developed a working prototype designed in the shape of a pair of eyeglasses that help us demonstrate the interaction techniques and actuations. We also present an advanced design that is minimalistic in its use of components.

Light Perfume

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Mirroring is the behavior in which one person copies another person usually while in social interaction with them and is one of the most powerful ways to build rapport quickly. When meeting someone for the first time, mirroring their seating position, posture, body angle, gestures, expressions and tone of voice are some useful examples of doing this. Before long, your partner will start to feel that there’s something about you they like and they may even describe you as ‘easy to interact with’. This is because they see themselves reflected in you.

Lighting and scents have shown to have an important role in reinforcing special perception, activity and mood setting, emotion, judgments, and even social relationship. Light Perfume was designed to help people mirror each other using visual and olfactory outputs to strengthen a user’s psychological bond with the partner. We do this by synchronizing the speed and blinking color of LEDs and emit the same perfume scent from each person’s device during a face-to-face conversation. The outputs are chosen based on inputs from the user’s environment such as noise levels and expressive body gestures.

Light Perfume was designed in a bangle in order to directly stimulate a user’s eyes and unobtrusively stimulate a user’s nose from the wrist. It also is a perfect location for sensors that detect acceleration of the arms and sound from the surrounding area. The aroma is created by heating solid perfume and emitted by the movement of the wearer’s conscious and subconscious body gestures during a conversation.

Foodie: Play with Your Food Promote Interaction and Fun with Edible Interface. Full Journal Paper in IEEE Transactions of Consumer Electronics

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Congratulations to Ph.D student Wei Jun (@weijun924) for having a full paper accepted in the journal IEEE Transactions of Consumer Electronics! The abstract of our paper is below.

Abstract — This paper presents Foodie, a novel interactive system that promotes interactive entertainment using the real edible food, connecting digital playfulness with active participation in the food creation and eating experience. Through this system, people can not only create novel food media and share with remote family members or friends, but also serve them with the physical food. This system adds another natural and organic dimension – edible food with smell and taste, to enhance the lifelike feeling and enrich the play experience. We believe the actual manipulation of real food through digital drawings would increase the engagement and enjoyment even for remote people, extending the digital playfulness of food games with real life experience. Besides social entertainment, this intuitive interface also provides an attractive channel for kids to try out and learn about realistic cooking, in a safe, creative and playful way

Mobile implementation and user evaluation of the Huggy Pajama system

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Mobile implementation and user evaluation of the Huggy Pajama system

Tasting with Sounds

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It’s now an accepted fact that our sense of taste is intrinsically linked to our sense of smell. But scientists now think that it can be heavily influenced by what we hear, too. Time to reach for Sounds of Skillet Bacon Vol. 2. The Smithsonian reports a new study published in the journal Food Quality and Science which investigated the relationships between music and taste. In a blinded experiment, 20 tasters reported that high-pitched music made toffees taste sweeter compared to low music—even though they were exactly the same candies. Elsewhere, a series of experiments carried out at the University of Oxford asked volunteers to match wines, milk and other foods with particular musical notes. They found that that sweet-tasting desserts tend to be matched up with high notes, while deeply savory dishes tend to be paired with brassy, low-pitched sounds. Charles Spence—an expert on multi-sensory experiences—has found that it’s even possible to sway our experiences of taste. Speaking to The Smithsonian, he explained: “We’ve shown that if you take something with competing flavors, something like bacon-and-egg ice cream, we were able to change people’s perception of the dominant flavor-is it bacon, or egg?-simply by playing sizzling bacon sounds or farmyard chicken noises.” So, what’s happening? Are we primed by advertising? Is it something to do with the way parents offer up food? Actually, it’s unclear to all these researchers why the effect exists. Which probably means you shouldn’t worry about it too much—just stick on your favorite falsetto-laden track and shovel candies down your throat. They’ll taste all the sweeter for it. [The Smithsonian]

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